Posts Tagged ‘pasture management’

Grass-Fed Beef Notebook

February 1, 2011

from: The Small Farm Institute

“This handbook has been created as a resource starting point for individuals wanting to have more information about grass-fed beef. It is the compilation from a series of the workshops that were held with a group of Ohio dairy and beef farmers The opportunity to do the workshops and this handbook came from a grant provided by the Agricultural Marketing Service’s Farmers Market Promotion Program, United States Department of Agriculture. The project was titled “ Building a Grass-Fed Beef Production Infrastructure To Support Marketing and Serve Consumers’ Demands. “

Follow this LINK.

Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service

April 30, 2010

Check out theire calendar for several great seminars/field days!!

Calendar HERE

Commercial goat conference to focus on production information

October 26, 2009

from: news.uns.purdue.edu

“Commercial goat producers can learn about everything from forages and fence options to marketing and doe herd traits at an Oct. 30 and 31 conference at the Harrison County Fairgrounds in Corydon, Ind.

The first Corn Country Commercial Goat Conference, sponsored by Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service in Harrison and Clark counties, will feature university speakers from Purdue, Tennessee State, Oklahoma State and Langston, as well as from the meat goat industry.

“This is a national conference about raising goats,” said David Trotter, Purdue Extension educator in Clark County and conference speaker. “Attendees will learn new production information and sources where they can go to get information after the conference ends.”

More Info Here

Controlled Grazing (VIDEO)

October 20, 2009

from: cattlenetwork.com

Video on controlled (rotational) grazing by the University of Tennessee.

Link to Video Here

Fencing Systems For Intensive Grazing Management

October 20, 2009

from: thebeefsite.com

“Making the most of your forage with rotational grazing, will allow stocking rates to be increased resulting in increased beef production per acre, write extension officers, L.W. Turner, C.W. Absher and J.K. Evans, from the University of Kentucky.

For intensive grazing to be managed effectively, controlled grazing needs to be in place, through subdividing the pasture through the use of fencing. Rotating animals among these paddocks will optimise forage and beef production.”

Full Article Here

Alabama Forage Conference scheduled Dec. 10

October 20, 2009

from: southeastfarmpress.com

“Farmers from Alabama and across the Southeast have the opportunity to hear from national leaders in forage production at the 2009 Alabama Forage Conference, being held in west Alabama.

Don Ball, a forage agronomist with the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, says the event will be one of the best one-day forage conferences held in the country this year.

“At this conference, livestock producers will have an excellent chance to hear the latest research and information on forages and grazing management from some of the nation’s top authorities,” says Ball. “For example, Susan Duckett of Clemson University will discuss the impact forages have on the meat quality of grass-fed beef.”

The Dec. 10 conference will be held at the University of West Alabama in Livingston. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m.

Ball says a particularly interesting speaker will be Joe Bouton, currently senior vice-president with the Noble Foundation.

“While he was at the University of Georgia, he developed a number of important forage varieties. He will be talking about opportunities with improved forage varieties.”

The conference will cover diverse aspects of forages and forage production, Ball adds.”

More Info Here

Forage and Hay Production (VIDEO)

October 6, 2009

from: midwestagnet.com

Another well-done video from MidwestAgNet.com.

Link to Video Here

Springtime Sheep Grazing Helps Control Leafy Spurge

October 6, 2009

from: ars.usda.gov

“Using sheep to control leafy spurge works best if it’s done in the spring every year, according to an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) study.

After a few years of sheep grazing during spring, desirable forage grasses gain the upper hand as leafy spurge declines. Compared to applying herbicides and replanting pastures, prescribed grazing with sheep is inexpensive, according to researchers at the ARS Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory in Miles City, Mont., and cooperators.”

Full Article Here

Feeder Cattle: 300-Day Grazing Demonstration Budget – Did We Make Any Money?

October 6, 2009

from: cattlenetwork.com

“On July, 1, 2008, the Livestock and Forestry Branch Station at Batesville and the Animal Science faculty began a project to apply research-based management practices to demonstrate 300 days of grazing. The cow herd was predominately Brangus Balancer cross females (38 head) with a September 1 to November 1 calving season and a November 21 to January 2 breeding season. The calf crop percentage was 84%. The six cows that either lost a calf or were not pregnant were sold, and cows with young calves were purchased for replacements. Two Hereford bulls were leased and fertility tested prior to the breeding season. The bulls were in the top 60% of the breed for weaning weight and marbling EPDs.”

Full Article Here

Forage Focus: Not All Land Is Created Equal

September 24, 2009

from: cattlenetwork.com

“Land mapping of “ecosites” in pastures is helping producers determine stocking rates. This mapping process identifies potential forage production for all the individual ecosites to determine the number of acres needed to provide the nutritional requirement for a cow for a month.

Did you know this process commonly is called acres per animal unit month (AUM) per pasture?

The process seems complicated, but times are changing. The concept of individual ecosites within a pasture and relative productivity is very real, so it is time to listen up and get with the program.”

Full Article Here

Practical Aspects of Feeding Grass to Dairy Cows

September 24, 2009

from: thedairysite.com

“Research that has been carried out by Teagasc at Moorepark Farm, Ireland have shown that fresh grass is one of most productive and viable feeds. Complete grass systems are operated in New Zealand and Australia – should other countries be adapting these grass management techniques to increase milk yields. From the 43rd University of Nottingham Feed Conference, TheCattleSite junior editor Charlotte Johnston.”

Full Article Here

Top 10 pasture boosters

September 22, 2009

from: agriculture.com

“Feed costs can be a real bear when it comes to making money on beef cattle these days, especially with the added pressures of today’s tight economic situation. One way to keep from being bitten too hard by poor economic conditions is by getting the most from your pasture acres. Here are 10 tips from Iowa State University Forage and Livestock specialists Steve Barnhart and Dan Morrical to get more production out of your pastures.”

Full Article Here

What Interest Rate is Your Pasture Paying?

September 15, 2009

from: thebeefsite.com

“Most pasture plants are in debt this year as the dry conditions and cold spring put most plants behind in their spring “loan payments” to their root systems.

Overgrazed plants had a further set back. They are operating at credit card interest rates on fully borrowed operating loans. Add to that early dormancy due to the very dry conditions which in many areas stopped plant growth and even caused plants to go dormant.

These plants had to tap into their “operating loan” and will have more ‘root debt’, to pay back at “operating loan interest” (if not overgrazed) when growth starts again. The solution is to pay “plant debt” down through good pasture management decision-making, starting now with no overgrazing.

“Overgrazing is leaving animals on pasture too long or bringing them back too soon,” says Grant Lastiwka,grazing/forages/beef specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development.”

Full Article Here

Pasture Condition Ratings

September 9, 2009

from: agweb.com

State by state ratings from the USDA.

Link Here

Grazing studies’ value limited without human factor

September 8, 2009

from: hpj.com

“Although 60 years of studies comparing grazing systems show no difference in biomass and animal production, the value of human management is excluded from those studies, said a rangeland research specialist.

The rigors of scientific study require strict controls on the study environment, said Justin Derner, research rangeland management specialist for the USDA Agricultural Research Service. Replicated studies with controls eliminate all possible variables, including differences in management. They’re also conducted on smaller acreages than most producers would manage.

The manager’s judgment calls, as well as her or his goals and values are taken out of the equation, Derner said. Emerging concerns about sustainability are also largely ignored.

Derner believes that a grazing system succeeds or fails because of good or bad management.”

Full Article Here


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